Anti-Magick

This is not exactly a house rule - it's taken directly from the book - this is just my interpretation of the authors' tortured grammar.

As usual with White Wolf, this assumes that the opponent is another mage. If the opponent is a different type of super, then these rules will be tweaked as specified by other house rules.

Special note: On these rolls, you cannot spend Quint to reduce difficulty, but can (as usual) spend a point of Willpower for an automatic success.

Basic countermagick

Soak an incoming effect.

  • You need at least 1 in each sphere used in the effect.
  • Arete vs 7 if the effect targets you, 8 if it targets someone else.
  • Successes cancel 1:1.

Offensive countermagick

Reflect an incoming effect.

  • You need at least 1 in one or more of the spheres used in the effect, plus Prime 1.
  • Arete vs 9.
  • You must get more successes than the attacker.

Sphere-versus-sphere countermagick

Create your own effect that disrupts an incoming effect.

  • You need to come up with something that you have the spheres to create, and that would plausibly disrupt the incoming effect if successful.
  • Arete vs 8.
  • Successes cancel 1:1.

Anti-magick

Reinforce static reality.

  • You need Prime 2 or higher.
  • Prime (not Arete) vs 8; you cannot split your dice pool this round.
  • Each success allows you to spend 1 Quint to raise the attacker's difficulty by 1; this can raise difficulty by more than 3, but cannot raise it above 10.
  • Attacker may spend Quint and/or Willpower as usual.

Unweaving

Disassemble an ongoing effect.

  • You need at least 1 in each sphere used in the effect, plus Prime 1.
  • Arete vs 8.
  • Successes cancel 1:1.
  • You may do this as an extended ritual; on a botch, the ongoing effect is not weakened at all.
  • Whenever unweaving is attempted, the creator of the ongoing effect rolls Wits+Intuition vs 7 to realize it.
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